New products, Conferences, Books, Papers, Internet of Things

Archive for January, 2014

FlyportPro: The ultimate module for IoT/M2M (WI-FI,GPRS,LAN)

FPROThe IoT (Internet of Things) market is growing fast and manufacturers are rushing to meet the challenge, putting pressure on research and development teams. New products are expected to reach market quickly and at low price points in order to keep up with the competition.

“It’s a new era, where service is king. IoT is a brand new stream of business opportunities that create services on top of connected devices. And FlyportPRO is a game changer, reducing the risk, time and cost of a new IoT product” says Claudio Carnevali, CEO of openPicus.

FlyportPRO is a new system-on-module made by openPicus. The new module is extremely compact, programmable and internet-connected, so there’s no need for an external processor. It runs the openPicus software framework, reducing development time by months thanks to the free IDE (Integrated Development Environment.)

FlyportPRO has everything needed to manage sensors and actuators: Digital I/Os, Analog channels, a real time clock and memory onboard. It also can directly incorporate SD cards, USB devices and I2C/SPI advanced sensors. It’s available in 3 pin-compatible versions: Wi-Fi, GPRS and Ethernet.

More info here.

Thingsquare IoT and Contiki courses – now online too

For spring 2014, the Thingsquare IoT development and Contiki programming course program has been expanded with both a new on-site workshop on advanced Contiki programming and a new set of online courses.

Check out the Thingsquare online courses here and the two-day workshop training courses here.

The courses are intended for developers and decision makers who want to hit the ground running when planning or developing their connected products. If you want to build the next Nest, these courses are for you!

The online courses are intended to broaden the amount of people who can attend the Thingsquare courses, to get more people up and running.

The two-day workshop courses are running as usual in Stockholm, Sweden. Register quickly to get the early-bird discount!

Why the ‘Internet of Things’ may never happen

From ComputerWorld:

Research firm Gartner says the “Internet of Things” will have 26 billion connected devices by 2020. Maybe. But connected to what? And how? Here’s what you need to know about the “Internet of Things” phenomenon.

There will be no ‘Internet of Things’, The label “Internet of Things” is used to describe Internet-connected devices that communicate without human involvement. For example, as you read this article, you’re using the regular Internet. You’re a human being who is communicating with another human being (Yours Truly), and this communication is facilitated by many other human beings (editors, web designers, engineers, etc.). Like Soylent Green, the Internet is made out of people — and computers whose main purpose is to help people use the Internet.

The “Internet of Things” is different mainly in that it’s not made out of people.

Let’s imagine a scenario 10 years into the future when the “Internet of Things” is supposed to be established. You come home with a hypothetical “smart toaster,” which connects to the Internet. You plug it into a kitchen outlet. The toaster boots up, finds the home Wi-Fi network and sends out a query to all the other smart devices registered to you. Your alarm clock, smart toothbrush, TV, smartphones, tablets, PCs, smart glasses, smart smoke detector, home automation base station, smart clothes, smart fridge, smart washer and dryer and smart kitty litter box each in turn introduces itself to the toaster, telling its unique identifiers and what they’re capable of doing. The toaster responds in kind. In the future, the toaster can send and receive instructions from other devices.

For example, you have friends over for breakfast and make several slices of toast. There’s a lot of heat and a little smoke, and your smart smoke detector suspects a fire. So it sends out a message to the other devices saying, in effect, “is anyone creating heat and smoke?” The toaster can respond the equivalent of: “Yeah, it’s me. No fire here and nothing to be alarmed about.” So the smoke alarm doesn’t sound.

“Things” are connecting to each other and interoperating without human involvement. That’s one consumery example of the “Internet of Things.” (There will be industrial and other applications on a massive scale.) The “Internet of Things” is a bad name because “things” don’t have their own Internet. They use the regular Internet. There is no separate “Internet of Things.” “Things of the Internet” would be closer. And “things that interact with other things without human involvement” would be even more accurate.

Another reason why the “Internet of Things” is a bad name is that the devices can make these connections without using the Internet. Some can connect peer-to-peer, or over a local network, without going online. The ability to connect to the Internet is not a necessary criterion for inclusion in the “Internet of Things” category.

Read the complete article here.

Contiki-based Products at CES 2014

From The Official Contiki OS Blog:

Held in January every year in Las Vegas and with some 160000 attendees, the Consumer Electronics Show, CES, is by far the largest event in the consumer electronics industry. Products are launched, announcements are made, and the press goes wild.

At CES 2014, a number of products and systems based on Contiki were shown:

WigWag

WigWag is a system for building intelligent environments that had a successful Kickstarter funding campaign in 2013.

Thingsquare

Thingsquare was there to show the Contiki-based Thingsquare cloud IoT system. Check out this video where Texas Instruments demonstrates the Thingsquare system.

LIFX

The LIFX WiFi bulbs were also represented.

tado°

tado° is an app that lets you set the comfort of your home directly from your smartphone. Read more about tado° at CES 2014 here.

“Wireless Sensor Networks for Developing Countries” Springer CCIS Book Series Now Available

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the First International Conference on Wireless Sensor Networks for Developing Countries, WSN4DC 2013, held in Jamshoro, Pakistan, in April 2013.

The 10 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 30 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on WSN applications/services for developing countries; mobile WSN; underwater WSN; VANETS; body area networks; energy harvesting in WSN; WSN and cloud integration; WSN and IoT; QoS and Qot; WSN MAC, network and transport protocols; cross layer approaches; security aspects in WSN; WSN applications in smart grid and energy management; WSN in structural health monitoring.

More info is available here.

International Workshop on Robotic Sensor Networks

Recent developments in sensing and actuation technology, along with the miniaturization of computing and communication, have led to the development of commodity robot technology such as hobby drones and robot toolkits. These platforms are bringing sensing and actuation at places where traditional technology does not reach; for example, for aerial pollution monitoring or for disaster management in remote areas.

This novel class of cyber-physical systems (CPS) take many of the design, implementation, and validation issues of traditional CPSs to an extreme. Control, sensing, estimation, and algorithms for localization, mapping, navigation, and exploration of individual robots are needed to govern their movements. The timing aspects of vehicle operation are key to provide run-time guarantees about performance. The software design and implementation must lead to provably correct execution. Noisy or inaccurate information sensed by the robots must be properly handled to ensure an accurate understanding of the environment.

Research efforts to address the issues above, while related, have previously progressed independently with little cross-fertilization across diverse disciplines such as robotics, real-time systems, signal processing, and software development. The goal of this workshop is to create a platform where researchers from different communities can get together to better understand the latest developments in these related fields as well as to establish connections for future interdisciplinary work. The workshop intends to provide a platform to enable such cross-fertilization, to ultimately speed up the development of the field and to foster rich interdisciplinary work in the future. Particularly, co-location with the Cyber-Physical Systems week will be an asset in this regard. CPSWEEK is the premiere CPS event that brings together five top conferences from complementary areas such as Embedded Systems, Real-time Systems, Sensor Networks, Hybrid Systems, and Networked Systems.

To build the needed interdisciplinary work ultimately necessary to the development of the field, the workshop seeks technical contributions describing original, previously unpublished results in all topics related to the design of robotic sensor networks, including works across two or more of the following topic areas:

  • Programming of robot swarms
  • Low-power communication in robot networks
  • Sensing coverage using robotic swarms
  • Task allocation
  • Distributed sensing
  • Coordination in robotic swarms
  • Verification and validation
  • Distributed planning and navigation
  • Novel applications
  • Experience reports

Deadlines
Submission deadline: Feb 14, 2014.
Notifications : Mar 5, 2014.
Camera ready : TBD.
Workshop : Apr 13, 2014, at 2pm.

More info and submission guidelines available here