New products, Conferences, Books, Papers, Internet of Things

Archive for the ‘wsn-products’ Category

Low-Power Wireless Bus (LWB)

We are happy to announce the open-source release of the Low-power Wireless Bus (LWB), a communication protocol for low-power wireless embedded systems. By mapping all communication onto network-wide Glossy floods, LWB lets low-power wireless nodes communicate as if they were connected to a shared bus, thus hiding the complexity of the underlying multi-hop topology from upper layers.

You may find the LWB and Glossy code on https://github.com/ETHZ-TEC/LWB including instructions on running an LWB demo application. We also outline the current code status and layout and provide references for further reading.

The system includes a revised implementation of LWB as described in the original SenSys’12 paper, based on a minimal subset of Contiki. While LWB itself is mostly platform-independent, the underlying Glossy code is platform-specific. There is a new port of Glossy for the CC430 SoC platform, which features an 868/915 MHz radio and an MSP430 microcontroller on one chip. In the future, we intend to incorporate also the first Glossy port for the TelosB platform. In the meantime, you may find this port at http://sourceforge.net/p/contikiprojects/code/HEAD/tree/ethz.ch/glossy/

We would like to invite the community to check out the code and to get in touch with us if you have comments, suggestions, bug reports, or would like to get involved and submit your code contributions to LWB and Glossy. We particularly welcome the contribution of Glossy ports to other state-of-the-art platforms.

MotorMood for socially aware driving

ab43feece71365df937ed12b2192eaff_originalHere is cool idea: use a light-up smiley face that affixes to a vehicle’s rear window to communicate simple yet important messages to other drivers, like saying ‘thank you’.

Now you can take that and other socially clever practices into your daily driving. Simply join the pledge at this kick-starter project, dubbed MotorMood, and voila! …start spreading smiley face in your community.

A detailed article from entrepreneur.com can be found here.

CAP-XX Launches 0.6mm Thinline Supercapacitors for Designing Wearable, Ultra-Portable and Connected IoT Devices

CAP-XX, developer of flat supercapacitors for burst and back-up power in space-constrained electronic devices, today launched its Thinline series of single-cell supercapacitors. The world’s thinnest at 0.6mm thick, and with prices starting at less than US$1 in large volumes, Thinline was developed to address the size, weight and cost challenges of designing thin, sometimes disposable electronic devices for the Internet of Things (IoT). Examples include wearables (medical, fitness and health monitors, smart watches, drug delivery systems), portables (active credit cards, smartphones, RFID tags), and connected electronics (smart homes and smart buildings, electronic shelf labels, wireless sensor networks).

To reduce thickness and manufacturing costs, CAP-XX increased the power and energy density in its electrode materials to deliver equivalent performance in about half the volume, and eliminated the folded edges and copper terminals that contribute to thickness in its standard line supercapacitors. (For comparison, CAP-XX’s thinnest traditional single-cell supercapacitor is 1.10mm.)

CAP-XX supercapacitors benefit from a unique nanotechnology construction that stores electrical charge in engineered carbon electrodes on aluminium foil, to minimize resistance and maximize capacitance (scroll down to CAP-XX Nanotechnology to view diagrams at http://www.cap-xx.com/products/photo-gallery). This unique electrode construction packs the highest energy and power densities possible into thin, prismatic packages.

More info here.

Weightless-N Open Standard Released

The Weightless SIG announced the publication of version 1.0 of the new Weightless-N open standard based on a low power wide area star network architecture. Operating in sub-GHz spectrum using ultra narrow band (UNB) technology, Weightless-N offers best in class signal propagation characteristics leading to excellent range of several kilometres even in challenging urban environments. Very low power consumption provides for exceptionally long battery life measured in years from small conventional cells and leading edge innovation in design minimises both terminal hardware and network costs.

Central to the Weightless proposition is its status as an open standard. Weightless is differentiated from all alternative proprietary LPWAN technologies by uniquely enabling a competitive, free and fair market that does not lock developers into using particular vendors or network service providers.

Details of hardware supporting Weightless-N as well as SDKs will be made available on the Weightless website shortly.

More information available here

New UART to WIFI chipset will unleash low cost Internet of Things

New UART to WIFI chipset will unleash low cost Internet of Things | olimex

WiFi infrastructure is everywhere which makes easier to make network of devices connected to WiFi.

There is also great range of WIFI routers with different space coverage and speeds, and as they are mass produced product the prices are at the rock bottom if we have to compare to Zigbee or Bluetooth.

WiFi stack require resources though and not quite good for smallish 8bit populary hobby processors, this is why UART-to-WIFI solutions were made and become popular.

Texas Instruments released CC3000 which cost about $20-25 in single quantities and $10 in volume.

It took no longer and Chinese company Espressif released their ESP8266 highly integrated UART-WIFI bridge IC, it requires just quartz crystal and balun to make WIFI module, their reference design is with just 11 x 12 mm board space!

And of course this comes at Chinese prices: you can buy ESP8266 module in single quantity from Seedstudio for $6.95 or from Alibaba for $5!

On top of this you can easy connect devices to Internet and send and receive data through UART!

This will definitely wipe out the $50-60 Arduino WIFI shields and even Microchip’s MRF24WB0MA etc modules.

We are going definitely to release MOD-ESP8266 which to connect to all our boards with UEXT and give possibility to connect to Internet with simple AT commands!

With MOD-IO2+MOD-ESP8266 for instance anyone could make WIFI enabled relay and Inputs and monitor through web page the inputs and drive relays for extremly low cost!

via New UART to WIFI chipset will unleash low cost Internet of Things | olimex.

Out in the Open: The Little-Known Open Source OS That Rules the Internet of Things

Contiki-ipv6-rpl-cooja-simulationFrom Wired:

You can connect almost anything to a computer network. Light bulbs. Thermostats. Coffee makers. Even badgers. Yes, badgers.

Badgers spend a lot of time underground, which make it difficult for biologists and zoologists to track their whereabouts and activities. GPS, for example, doesn’t work well underground or in enclosed areas. But about five years ago, University of Oxford researchers Andrew Markham and Niki Trigonisolved that problem by inventing a wireless tracking system that can work underground. Their system is clever, but they didn’t do it alone. Like many other scientists, they turned to open source to avoid having to rebuild fundamental components from scratch. One building block they used is an open source operating system called Contiki.

“Contiki was a real enabler as it allowed us to do rapid prototyping and easily shift between different hardware platforms,” says Markham, now an associate professor at the University of Oxford.

Contiki isn’t nearly so well-known as Windows or OS X or even Linux, but for more than a decade, it has been the go-to operating system for hackers, academics, and companies building network-connected devices like sensors, trackers, and web-based automation systems. Developers love it because it’s lightweight, it’s free, and it’s mature. It provides a foundation for developers and entrepreneurs eager to bring us all the internet-connected gadgets the internet of things promises, without having to develop the underlying operating system those gadgets will need.

Perhaps the biggest thing Contiki has going for it is that it’s small. Really small. While Linux requires one megabyte of RAM, Contiki needs just a few kilobytes to run. Its inventor, Adam Dunkels, has managed to fit an entire operating system, including a graphical user interface, networking software, and a web browser into less than 30 kilobytes of space. That makes it much easier to run on small, low powered chips–exactly the sort of things used for connected devices–but it’s also been ported to many older systems like the Apple IIe and the Commodore 64.

Read the complete article here.

Open Garden – Hydroponics & Garden Plants Monitoring for Arduino

The Open Garden platform consist of three different kits, each ready for a specific kind of growing plant scenario: indoor houses and greenhouses, outdoor gardens and fields and hydroponics plants in water installations.

The platform allows to control the state of the plants by sensing several parameters:

Soil moisture (Indoor & Outdoor kits)

Temperature + Humidity + Light (All kits)

Water sensors: pH, Conductivity, Temperature (Hydroponics kit

Then it uses different types of actuators to modify the state of the plants by irrigating them or activating lights and oxygen pumps:

Water pump + Droppers for Drip Irrigation (Indoor kit)

Electro valve + Sprinkler for Sprinkling (Outdoor kit)

Oxygen Pump + Growing Light (Hydroponics kit)

The nodes send periodically the information to the Gateway that uploads the data to a web server by using any of the available wireless interfaces WiFi, GPRS, 3G. We have also designed a web application that allows to store in a data base the information gathered and visualize it from a browser and iPhone / Android device. We have released it as open source code so that you can improve it and make it personal for your own product!!

Open Garden has been designed to work with both 220V Europe & 110V US.

via Open Garden – Hydroponics & Garden Plants Monitoring for Arduino.