New products, Conferences, Books, Papers, Internet of Things

Posts tagged ‘cisco’

Cisco, TI Expand IoT Partnerships

Cisco Systems and Texas Instruments have announced separate efforts to expand partnerships serving the emerging Internet of Things. TI named eight IoT cloud service partners and said more are on the way; Cisco launched a challenge for IoT startups and promised to work with the winners.

TI said it will work with 21emetry, ARM, Arrayent, Exosite, IBM, Spark, Thingsquare, and Xively to provide cloud services for customers of its chips. The company said it is continuing to recruit partners in IoT cloud services.

The move highlights how quickly new providers of cloud services for IoT are coming out of the woodwork with various skill sets and offerings. The other rapidly expanding area in IoT is in design services to handle technical needs of the broad variety of market sectors looking to adopt wireless sensor networks of various kinds.

About 15 companies are now offering some sort of IoT cloud service, many of them listed online, a TI representative said.

“They offer different levels of service, application and demographic focus areas,” said the TI rep. “Some have strong presence in industrial and some are more consumer focused…All of them provide Web interfaces with APIs to build cloud applications [and] some provide advanced business services as well,” he added.

Separately, Cisco will pick three winners in its IoT startup challenge, who will share $250,000. The contest spans work on IoT applications, analytics, management, and connectivity. Cisco will help winners develop, test, and pilot new technologies and potentially partner with or invest in them. The company is taking applications April 21 through July 1.

via Cisco, TI Expand IoT Partnerships | EE Times.

How Big The Internet Of Things Could Become

From ReadWrite:

75 billion.

That’s the holy-@$#! number of devices that Cisco believes will be connected to the Internet of Things by 2020. That’s 9.4 devices for every one of the 8 billion people that’s expected to be around in seven years.

To help put that into more perspective, back in Cisco also came out with the number of devices it thinks were connected to the Internet in 2012, a number Cisco’s Rob Soderbery placed at 8.7 billion. Most of the devices at the time, he acknowledged were the PCs, laptops, tablets and phones in the world. But other types of devices will soon dominate the collection of the Internet of Things, such as sensors and actuators.

By the end of the decade, a nearly nine-fold increase in the volume of devices on the Internet of Things will mean a lot of infrastructure investment and market opportunities will available in this sector. And by “a lot,” I mean ginourmous. In an interview with Barron’s, Cisco CEO John Chambers figures that will translate to a $14-trillion industry.

Granted, Cisco has a lot of reasons to be bullish about the prospect of the Internet of Things: with product offerings in the router and switch space and a recent keen interest on building intelligent routing and application platforms right inside those devices, Cisco stands to gain a lot of business if it can get itself out in front of this newfangled Internet of Things.

It’s not just Cisco talking up the Internet of Things: late last week, Morgan Stanley published a big 29-page research note on the topic that sought to at once define the Internet of Things and also quantify its size, growth and potential to make money.

Morgan Stanley’s brief was bullish as a whole, though it did deliver expectations from other companies that weren’t quite so high as Cisco’s: “Intel (INTC) forecasts that the Internet of Things will represent a 3.8-billion device opportunity by 2015 (including mobile computing i.e., tablets, smartphones…) and ABI research forecasts that number will reach 30 billion by 2020.”

Read the whole article here.

Cisco to Unveil Networking for Internet of Things Sept. 24

Cisco Systems executives on Sept. 24 will unveil a networking system they say will underpin the infrastructure for the upcoming wave of the Internet of Everything.

For the longest time, networking was about speed and cost—increasing how quickly data could move around and between data centers, and doing so while continuously reducing costs. However, that’s changing, according to Cisco officials. While speed and cost are still important factors in networking, the real challenge will be the rapid increase in Internet traffic that will happen in the coming years, driven by such trends as cloud computing, mobility, video and machine-to-machine (M2M) connections, according to Pankaj Patel, executive vice president and chief development officer at Cisco.

“In my 20 years in networking, I have seen various market transitions in the networking industry and many of those were led with innovation on how to tackle the immense growth in bandwidth,” Patel wrote in a post on the Cisco blog. “And today we are at the crossroads of another such transition—and this time it is not just about solving the bandwidth challenge—as it is not just about growth in video, cloud, and mobility but also people connecting with various data , processes and things.”

By 2017, there will be more than 12 billion smart devices—from phones and televisions to tablets and smartphones—and more than 8.2 billion M2M nodes, as compared with 2.6 billion in 2012, he wrote. Each node and smart device will have its own profile in networking, compute and control environments.

“This is the emerging Internet of Everything phenomenon, where trillions of connected ‘events’ will be generated,” Patel wrote.

What Cisco will announce Sept. 24 will address the changing data center demands into the next decade, he said, and will include the company’s nPower X1 integrated network processor, which officials introduced Sept. 12. It’s a processor that has more than 4 billion transistors, can offer multi-terabit levels of performance and can handle trillions of transactions. It’s aimed specifically at the Internet of Everything, Cisco’s term for the Internet of Things.

More info here.

IoE Connections Counter

From Cisco blog:

Right now, in 2013, 80 “things” per second are connecting to the internet.  Next year that number will reach almost 100 per second, and by 2020, more than 250 things will connect each second.

Add all of these numbers up, and we believe that more than 50 billion things  will be connected to the internet by 2020.  Today we’re launching the Cisco Internet of Everything (IoE) Connections Counter so that we can watch in real time as everything comes online.

By the way, what are all of these “things”?  Mobile devices, parking meters, thermostats, cardiac monitors, tires, roads, cars, supermarket shelves, and yes, even cattle.   The list is endless, and it just keeps getting longer and more interesting.  Literally, by the second.

Even more exciting is when all of these things are combined with people, process and data via the network to deliver transformational value to the world by improving the way we make decisions, saving us time and money, and so much more.  That’s the Internet of Everything, and its value increases every time we connect the unconnected.

So we’re paying close attention.  The connections counter will help us keep track of exactly where we are in this journey, starting now and continuing through 2020.

We encourage you to keep track as well.  Cisco invites journalists, analysts and other interested parties to check out the IoE Connections Counter and to feature it in your own content.

Let the countdown to 2020 and 50 billion connections begin!

More info here.

Cisco Says Its “Internet of Everything” Is Worth $14.4 Trillion. Really?

14.4trillionNetworking giant Cisco predicted Wednesday that as we move into a “fundamentally mobile and video” world, the “Internet of Everything” — which combines the so-called Internet of Things with the Internet used by people and their mobile devices — will create $14.4 trillion in value and boost overall corporate profits by 21%. All by 2022.

Those are some pretty big numbers, shared by Cisco executives at a press event in San Jose on Wednesday. But while the vision makes sense, quantifying the changes to be wrought by growth of the Internet of Everything seems, well, fairly abitrary. To say the least.

Rob Lloyd, Cisco President, Sales and Development, broke down the $14.4 trillion figure this way:

  • $2.5 trillion in better asset utilization
  • $2.5 trillion in employee productivity
  • $2.7 in supply chain logistics
  • $3.7 trillion in better customer experience.
  • $3 trillion in enabling new innovations.

Those may seem easier to grasp, but when you’re talking in trillions over decade-long time frames, it’s very hard to put much credence in calculations like these.

More info here.

 

Cisco CEO: Get ready for ‘the Internet of everything’

From Market Place Tech:

This week, we’re asking a range of accomplished figures in the tech world about what could be the next digital frontier.  Are we moving away from an Internet of webpages and toward an Internet of things, or an Internet of interconnected objects?

According to John Chambers, CEO of Cisco Systems, we’re heading towards what he calls “the Internet of everything.”

Think smart refrigerators that call the repair man when broken, or a water meter in your house that monitors use and decreases leakage.

“If you look back at they year 2000, maybe 200 million devices were connected, today it’s 10 billion. In 2020, it is 50 billion,” says Chambers. “We believe it will change every aspect of people’s lives.”

From a business perspective, Chambers says the vast new hook-up could save companies around the world $14.4 trillion over the next ten years.

The interview can be listened here.

Cisco’s new, smarter network for the Internet of things

By 2015, more people will access the Internet from mobile devices than from conventional PCs. A year later, in 2016, 19 billion devices and gizmos will be connected to the mobile Internet — not just your smartphone and tablet, but your washing machine, cars and clothes will be connected too.

That’s a giant problem for wireless carriers, which are already struggling to keep up with surging data demand. Trying to innovate their way out of the crunch, the industry is using new tools and tricks to optimize every bit of infrastructure.

Cisco added a key piece to the puzzle on Tuesday, releasing a new tool that will let carriers sift through and prioritize the traffic flooding their networks.

It sounds pretty geeky — “mobile packet core” product launches don’t inspire iPhone-like frenzies — but this back-end upgrade has some significant implications for everyday users.

The problem: Everyone has experienced the frustrating effects of wireless network congestion. Your video buffers forever, a website takes minutes to launch, or you can’t get Google Maps to load when you’re late to a meeting and don’t know where to go.

Much of that pain comes from the way that today’s networks give more or less the same priority to all kinds of traffic. Ads running on Angry Birds are treated the same as a Netflix video — not a good thing, if a bunch of ads on other people’s phones are causing your movie to stall.

More info here.