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Posts tagged ‘Intel’

Intel announces new Quark SoC for the internet of things

At the Intel Developers Forum in San Francisco on Tuesday, Intel’s CEO Brian Krzanich showed off a new system on a chip that’s designed for the internet of things. The Quark family of chips is one-fifth the size of the 22-nanometer Atom chips designed for smartphones, and operates at a tenth of the power. Intel says it has an “open architecture,” which boils down to Intel offering hooks in the silicon to add others’ IP blocks.

Intel does not plan to license the core itself, something analysts hoped it meant when it said it allow others to integrate their own IP with the core. As for the core Intel’s spokeswoman Caludia Mangano said that the first product in the Quark family is a synthesizable Pentium ISA compatible CPU core. It also includes a software stack that includes security, manageability and connectivity features well suited for IoT. No word on what standards might be supported in that software stack.

The key word for most analysts in that statement is synthesizable, which means that customers can add their own IP around the core. ARM for example let’s companies license its CPU core and then add their own co-processors, or other components to create chips optimized for a wide variety of projects and industries. How they would do this in practice is unclear as Mangano says that Intel plans to keep the manufacturing of the Quark SoCs in-house at Intel’s manufacturing facilities.

More info here.

Intel’s Sensors Will Warn You About Running Outside When The Air Is Polluted

Imagine a network of air quality monitors that kept you constantly up to date about big gusts of bad air. It’s on its way, and it might be partly powered by your own phone.

Imagine: you’re gearing up to take a jog along your regular route when an app on your smartphone pushes out a message: air pollution levels are high in the park where you like to run, so maybe you should try a recommended route that’s cleaner today. It doesn’t sound incredibly far-fetched; many cities already have pollution and weather sensors. But they’re usually located on top of buildings, far from human activity.

Intel has developed sensors that can be placed closer to the ground–on lamp posts and traffic lights, for example–to create what Intel senior principal engineer Terry O’Shea calls “a community-based approach to sensing.”

Intel is piloting a deployment of its pollution and weather sensors within a month in Dublin, Ireland. The goal: to put the sensors on both main roads and smaller streets to see if the company can create a real-time picture of health in the city. The weather sensors can track temperature, humidity, wind direction, and wind speed, while the pollution sensors track oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide.

There are a number of use cases for the technology–asthma sufferers will obviously benefit greatly, for example. According to O’Shea, a canal effect causes wind blowing along major thoroughfares to peel off into side streets and alleyways, where air contaminants end up as a result. So in big cities, “when it’s too hot and you want to open the windows, you want to know if you’ll get a bunch of pollution because there’s a big baseball game happened that day,” he says.

Eventually, Intel anticipates that sensors already in smartphones will also contribute to weather and pollution data aggregation. “Data coming from people on the streets can be aggregated back to city management dashboards,” explains Intel Labs researcher Jessica McCarthy.

Intel won’t reveal how much the sensors cost–they’re still in the prototype phase, anyway–but O’Shea says that they are ” two orders of magnitude below the cost level” of current sensors.

More info here.

Intel, Beijing Municipal Government and Chinese Academy Of Sciences Establish ‘Internet of Things’ Joint Research

Intel Corporation announced today a joint agreement with the Beijing Municipal Government and Institute of Automation of Chinese Academy of Sciences to establish “China Intel Internet of Things” (IoT) Joint Labs to collaborate on IoT-related core technology research, development and business model innovation. The three organizations will invest 200 million RMB (US$31.7 million) over the next 5 years.

IoT is a global technology evolution through which data from billions of devices are seamlessly connected, intelligently managed and securely interacting over a network. This enables people, devices and systems to turn data into useful information and valued services.

The foundation of the joint research will address the core technologies associated with IoT including sensing, networking and processing, among others that will help address computing, storage and communication challenges of massive-scale systems derived from the large amounts of data gathered.

Tan Tieniu, director of National Laboratory of Pattern Recognition Institute of Automation of Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Jesse Fang, vice president of Intel Labs and managing director of Intel Labs China, were named co-presidents of the China Intel IoT Joint Labs.

“The China Intel IoT joint labs is the largest of its kind that Intel has participated in research collaboration in China, and it is unique in that Intel not only contributed funding but also employees as dedicated senior research leaders,” said Fang. “New applications from personalized energy management to smart traffic control to smart cities will be made possible by the research conducted at these labs.”

More info here.

Intel shows disaster management tech at IDF, casts fireballs

Intel put some disaster management tech on display during a pre-IDF event yesterday and lucky for you, we got some hands-on time. The showcase focused on three main areas of disaster management: mitigation, preparedness and response. It included technologies such as connectivity provisions for disabled networks, energy management for distressed power grids, and — by far to most impressive item on display — fireballs! These spherical, rugged, low-cost, autonomous sensors are designed to be thrown into a fire and report data such as temperature, free-volatiles and air quality to first responder trucks via WiFi. Vital information such as the hottest spot and the chemical composition of a fire can be sent to both the firefighters’ smartphones and the backend offices. Initial readings make it easier to assess the situation before sending in human life.

More info here and here.

Intel Looks To Blanket The World With Self-Powered Sensors

Intel is developing self-powered microchips that could be implanted in the human body, a mobile phone, a building, or anyplace else where people wish to gather information.Called a “wireless identification and sensing platform,” or WISP, the devices were among several technologies described Friday by Intel CTO Justin Rattner during a meeting with reporters in San Francisco. Most of the technologies discussed are under development in Intel labs and are unlikely to reach the marketplace in products for at least three to five years.

All of the inventions were designed to be energy-efficient. The WISP sensors would use Intel technology for drawing power from the environment. “These are install-and-forget kind of systems,” Rattner said.

The power would come from wireless transmissions, such as a Wi-Fi hotspot, a cellular tower, or a TV broadcast, making it possible for the sensors to continuously gather information in almost any environment, Rattner said.

More info about this interesting project here.